World TB day 2018

Wanted: Leaders for a TB-free world

TB has now surpassed HIV as the world’s deadliest infectious disease in all but the lowest income countries, killing 1.7 million people in 2016. Prison populations, those in poverty and people who use drugs are particularly vulnerable. UNDP partners with the Global Fund to support and strengthen multi-sectoral national responses to TB in 11 countries by providing integrated policy, programme and capacity development support. Working closely with national governments and civil society organizations, this partnership has resulted in 850,000 people receiving treatment for TB and 19,100 people receiving treatment for multi-drug resistant TB. UNDP and the Global Fund support is also helping to dramatically improving the outlook for TB patients, highlighted by a decrease in TB related mortality across the countries where the partnership operates.

Results achieved through the UNDP - Global Fund partnership*

16 countries with a treatment success rate for TB over 80%

8 countries have seen TB incidence decrease by a third

10 countries where TB related mortality has decreased by more than a third

Djibouti: Finding the 'Missing' Cases of TB

 

Djibouti hosts more than 27,000 refugees from nearby Somalia, Ethiopia, and Eritrea, equivalent to roughly 3% of its population. With one of the highest densities of refugees in the world, crowded camps create a fertile breeding ground for the transmission of tuberculosis (TB). To limit the spread of the disease and ensure no one is left behind, the government of Djibouti, in partnership with UNDP, UNHCR and the Global Fund are working to bring diagnosis and treatment facilities into camps, reduce stigma and to stop TB in its tracks.

 

Read the full story here

 

Remarkable country results

Large decreases in TB related mortality (per 100,000 population)

Source: World Health Organization

Treatment success in Djibouti 

 

Through its partnership with the Global Fund in Djibouti, UNDP has supported the successful treatment of more than 3,000 people with TB. 

 

 

treatment success rate for TB (2015)

Source: World Health Organization

*results are for current and past programme countries